When Governments Spy on Citizens, They Invent a Great Excuse

In theory, everyone agrees that the public has a right to safety and privacy. Yet, in practice, it isn’t easy to balance these competing needs in a way that satisfies all parties.

Businesses like social media platforms often get stuck in the middle. Governments ask them for data on citizens in the name of national security or protecting the public, while citizens insist that their privacy be respected, and may leverage their power and leave the platform unless it is.

How can a company keep sensitive user data confidential and fulfill legal obligations to let the government access this data? Suspicions of government snooping are reasonable.

For years, the US government secretly spied on citizens. Former National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden famously blew the whistle on a massive government spy program in 2015. The excuse for spying on citizens in the wake on 9/11 was national security. Now, there’s another reason.

In March 2020, a bipartisan group of American senators introduced the EARN IT Act, which seeks to prevent child sexual exploitation online by targeting child predators on social media platforms. On the surface, of course, the goal of keeping children safe is laudable! But that’s just the problem: when the government wants to secretly access the public’s private information, it knows it needs a justification everyone supports.

However, privacy advocates warn that encryption will be completely compromised if the government can side-step it when they feel the need. If this law passes, it could spell the end of encryption. At least on certain public platforms; communicating through Myntex security services ensures that your private data will remain confidential no matter what legislation passes or how the courts rule.

Why Have Encryption if the Government Can Demand Your Communication?

In the past, big tech companies weren’t responsible for the content their users published. The proposed EARN IT Act will put the onus on these tech companies to ensure predators don’t use their platforms to violate children.

If the law passes, big tech companies could be held liable for the harm their users cause, unless they comply with a 16-person commission’s recommendations. To catch predators, the commission could recommend non-intrusive measures like scanning photos and videos proactively to ensure there is no abusive content, and communication surveillance. The latter is where things get dicey.

Either users can know that their private communications are confidential, or the government can force companies to grant them back-door access to this data. Companies offering end-to-end encryption may not be willing to comply with such requirements, since concealing the messages is the entire point of encryption.

Silicon Valley giants like Facebook argue they can protect children without undermining encryption or their users’ privacy rights. Members of Congress and law enforcement disagree. If the time should come where companies like Facebook need to choose between protecting users’ privacy rights and complying with a government order to access people’s communications, what will they pick?

For how long can they hold out? And so, the privacy battle continues.

End-to-End Encryption in Business

Business leaders must take security into their own hands. They need to get access to the strongest encryption algorithms available, as they can’t depend on platforms that may not be secure in the near future.

Secure communications create a stable atmosphere executives need for conducting business. CEOs can’t sit around and wait to see what the laws will be after the government is finished duking it out with big tech companies.

Even if big tech companies found a way to keep children safe from online predators without requiring back-door access to encrypted communications, the government could claim another pretext for needing access to citizens’ private communications. When one door is closed on them, they usually find another to open eventually.

Taking the initiative to get state-of-the-art end-to-end encryption means shutting the door on them. You need to know that your confidential data is private, which means ensuring your messages are encrypted, and your phone is otherwise protected against identity thieves, corporate saboteurs, or even the government.

Encryption in Everyday Life

People making million-dollar deals understand the need for security, but most people use the internet for countless purposes and routinely buy things online. Identity thieves don’t need a lot of information to wreak havoc on a private citizen.

Aside from our enhanced encryption, additional features like remote wipes and tamper-proofing are perfect for protecting everyday citizens’ basic communications. Here are some resources to help understand your options for encrypted technology, as the topic can be technically complicated.

Millions of people chat each day on platforms like Facebook, sending sensitive information across the internet without really thinking about who else could read it. Even text messages from one phone to another are vulnerable to a hack without the right level of encryption.

Myntex specializes in advanced encryption technology, and our phones have numerous features that complement the encryption. Even if your phone goes missing or a thief steals it, they won’t access its contents because of the layers of world-class protection.

Historically, learning how to navigate phones with leading encryption took technical knowledge and time to learn. Now, everyday users can enjoy modern functionality, knowing they’re as secure as can be. Myntex believes that communicating securely should be easy to use. Please feel free to learn more about who we are and what we set out to accomplish in the encryption industry.

The government will always claim an overriding need for them to obtain data on citizens, despite all their respect for the right to privacy. If it isn’t to keep children safe online or defend the country against terrorism, there’ll be another reason.

Of course, these are genuine safety issues that affect us all! But wherever big tech companies and the government decide to draw the line between privacy and security, business leaders and private citizens can ensure their own communications are secure by relying on encrypted phones by Myntex.

Businesses Need Privacy, Even from Governments

A recent court ruling demonstrates the perpetual tension between law enforcement and privacy rights for citizens. Whatever the formal laws on the books, or peoples’ expectations for the right to privacy, citizens cannot necessarily trust that data related to their private communications won’t be collected.

Early last month, a federal appeals court ruled that the National Security Agency’s (NSA) surveillance program that collected data on Americans’ telephone calls was illegal. Former NSA employee Edward Snowden famously blew the whistle on this program in 2013, believing it was wrong for telecommunication companies to share customer data with the government without disclosing that this was being done to the public.

While the government never ascertained the phone calls’ contents, this secretly-shared data told them which phone numbers people dialed, and the duration of these phone conversations. Known as “metadata,” this information may seem vague or innocuous if seen in isolation.

But stitching together all the pieces of metadata the government had on a person put together a much more complete picture. For example, it might not seem like such a big deal if you just look at one phone record. But if you examine all of them, you can see patterns over time that indicate how they spend their days, months, years. It shines a light on other people’s daily schedules and habits who interact with that person, and neither know they’re being tracked.

The government’s surveillance program was officially ended in 2015, after being deemed illegal and possibly unconstitutional. This most recent court ruling determined that when the government prosecutes someone, it must get a court order before surveilling them and notify them of the secret surveillance that provided the data which yielded the evidence.

However, the law only compels the government to reveal how they obtained their intelligence — it does not prevent them from getting this intelligence. While this is a welcome legal decision, the fact is the American government spied on potentially millions of its citizens for years before anybody even knew it was happening, never mind sought to end the practice.

What started under the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court after passing the Patriot Act in the wake of 9/11 to protect citizens ended up being used for different purposes altogether.

To understand the tension between privacy and law enforcement, you can’t just look at one case at a time. Instead, it’s a constant game of whack-a-mole: when the government has one door closed by a court ruling, they try to open up another legal front to obtain the right to spy on their citizens.

To be sure, sometimes the government and law enforcement genuinely need to crack down on heinous crimes and protect national security. However, there’s a danger that politicians use such a pretext merely as a reason to skirt privacy protections.

Businesses Can’t Rely on the Government to Stop Spying

In the years since the NSA was found to be spying on people, the US government has since enacted other legislation that reduces Americans’ privacy rights. In 2017, Donald Trump reversed an Obama-era law that required internet providers to obtain permission before sharing their personal data and even web-browsing history.

It was naïve to believe that shutting down the NSA’s secretive program in 2015 would result in a new era of transparency. Nor is the American government alone in spying on their citizens. The world of business is global, and governments worldwide vary in terms of their respect for privacy.

Whether it’s phone data, browser history, or more, it’s safe to assume that governments around the world are attempting to obtain private information on people without them knowing. Here are some quick tips to guard your privacy online that will help keep you safe in the meantime, but a comprehensive response is required.

The Connections Between Governments and Businesses

Some regions have strong links between the government and the leading businesses of that country, especially in the telecommunications industry. Businesses need to be wary of corporate rivals, but those rivals may have the state’s apparatus to help them spy, which only makes them more powerful.

Huawei is China’s controversial tech giant, and US intelligence says the world’s largest smartphone provider may spy on users on behalf of the Chinese government. The prospect of industry and governments combining their power to spy on people should make business leaders want secure their communications as quickly as possible.

Take Privacy into Your Own Hands

Certain industries rely on encrypted mobile security services from Myntex because they can’t afford to just sit back and hope that the government will not pry into their confidential communications. There are a multitude of different reasons why safeguarding this information is essential.

A hack can open companies up to multi-million-dollar lawsuits and shatter reputations that took years or even decades of fine business practices and branding campaigns to build. Information breaches can also cause devastating operational problems that are hard for companies to overcome.

As many as three of every four oil and natural gas companies have suffered a hack in recent years. Such breaches can result in the destruction of field data or loss to other vital proprietary information obtained at significant cost.

In many cases, commercial and retail businesses need robust security so their customers never face a breach in the first place. How can a company expect their customers to remain loyal after suffering a high-profile hack?

The public has never cared more about their privacy, and businesses are right to worry that one hack could be all it takes to lose a customer’s business forever. Our encryption services will grant you peace of mind, so business leaders can focus on growing revenue.

Feel free to contact us to learn more and see what products we offer to ensure you and your clients and customers all have their online data protected. Many governments worldwide have undermined privacy rights, and the courts often get the wrong balance between security and privacy. In this climate, the safest thing to do is get enterprise-grade encryption that protects your business, no matter who is in power or how the courts rule.

Who We Are

 

Myntex has been a global contender since mobile encryption emerged onto the market, but our manner of doing business has been what’s set us apart from the rest. We believe that running a legitimate, honest, and transparent business is key to gaining the trust and respect of our partners, customers, and competitors.

We have always been open with our intentions to make encryption readily available to everyone around the globe and we have never bought into blocking other providers, causing drama, or talking down about others in the industry. We feel that providing the best product coupled with the best customer service is key to healthy growth of our brand.

 

We operate our office and data center in Calgary, Alberta where we extend an open invitation to our partners, customers, and anyone else that is interested in learning about encryption. We don’t hide behind a website, or contact form but encourage people to come in to meet our team, and see our beautiful space.

 

Our data center is more than capable of handling the trials and tribulations that go along with running mission-critical services for our customers. You can read more about our data center here.

 

The Myntex office/data center is packed full of intriguing and fun things to help with morale, and encourage creativity. No one wants to come into boring a cubicle ridden office.

The sole purpose of creating our office the way we did was to make it welcoming to our current, and prospective partners and customers. We also want the place we work to reflect our business morals, and goals; to be fun, engaging, and modern.

 

With leading edge technology, world class customer support, 99.9% service up-time, and some of the brightest minds in the encryption industry we can confidently say that if you are looking to represent a brand, Myntex should be your first choice.

 

We would love to hear from you, feel free to get in touch with us!

Myntex Protect its Customers from Cyber Attacks. Here’s How.

Anyone with a computer or internet connection is vulnerable to a cyber attack. The motives behind these attacks vary, but generally the goal of hackers is to disable a network or service, expose confidential information, demand a ransom or steal private data. No matter the motivation, it’s always illegal and it’s becoming more and more common.

As a PGP encryption provider and a global business, Myntex is the target of something called a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack. In this post we’ll explore what a DDoS attack is and how Myntex has taken all the necessary steps to protect its customers.

 

What is a DDoS attack?

A DDoS attack happens when a hacker (or often a team of hackers) “flood” a network with requests and information in a bid to make a service unavailable. This flood overwhelms the server of a company or organization, and effectively takes it out of service. It’s illegal, but happens regularly, and it’s extremely difficult to track down the perpetrators because the attack usually comes from many different sources.

Before launching the attack, hackers will build a network of infected computers. These infected computers are called bots and when collectively used together they form a “botnet.” The hackers spread malware via emails and social media (read our last post about the dangers of phishing). Once they have a large enough botnet, hackers can use their army of computers to launch a coordinated attack.

Large-scale operations are often the target of DDoS attacks, including banks and health care systems. Many of the high-profile cyber incidents you’ve read about were most likely DDoS attacks.

 

How does Myntex protect its customers?  

We’re acutely aware of the threat of DDoS attacks. Keeping the data of our customers private and secure is our utmost priority. We protect PGP encryption customers with a two-prong approach.

First, only authorized individuals have the ability to communicate with the Myntex infrastructure, via our whitelist. This largely prevents DDoS attacks. Random computers don’t have the ability to launch an attack because we drop all unauthorized traffic from our system.

Second, we use Radware DDoS protection to further mitigate the threat of attacks.

Radware is a large and respected company that protects leading global businesses, as well as governments, from large-scale attacks.

Radware has the ability to detect and mitigate DDoS attacks as they are unfolding in real time and respond within seconds. They filter requests to our service, which gives us clean traffic. In turn, our infrastructure is protected and so are our customers.

Our customers retain their ability to communicate securely and privately using PGP encryption for BlackBerry.

 

 

Do you have more questions about how we protect customers from cyber attacks? Get in touch.

How to Guard Your Privacy Online: 5 Quick Tips

It can feel impossible to do anything online anymore without opening yourself up to significant privacy and security threats. Even without large-scale hacking incidents or government surveillance to worry about, there are still threats like email spam, which is both annoying and potentially dangerous.

Many of us take a relaxed approach to our online activities, perhaps because the threats to our privacy may not feel real or immediate. But everything we do leaves a digital footprint. And if we’re not careful, our information can be used against us as we lose access to email accounts and bank account passwords, or become victims of identity theft.

Consider taking these steps to guard your privacy online.

 

Never connect to an unsecured wifi network.

 It’s tempting to connect to an open wifi network as you sit in a coffee shop or a train station, but this is never a good idea. While secure networks are generally connected to a router, open wifi networks are often connected to other computers. Your personal information on your computer is at risk of being stolen or hacked the moment you connect to that open network.

 The safest thing to do is disable your wifi entirely on your phone until you know you can access a secure network, or to set up a VPN.

 

Online shop using only secure sites.

 Any reputable site will use the security protocol SSL for its online financial transactions. You’ll know that a site is using SSL when you look at the website address: it should say HTTPS at the beginning and you should also see a padlock icon. If these two things aren’t present, think twice before handing over your credit card information.

 

Take an honest look at your online activities.

 Be wary of any and all interactions. Thousands of people fall victim to scams on Facebook or via email, because they don’t stop to question what they’re doing. If you get a desperate Facebook message from a friend asking for a money, pick up your phone and call them to verify that they’re actually in trouble.

If you get an email from who you think is a trusted source, but something still feels off, inspect it carefully. Often, scammers will buy domain names that closely resemble one you’re familiar with, so that email addresses appear legitimate. This is called phishing. Inspect the email before you click any links. Always think twice before downloading any attachment.

A large-scale hacking incident at the University of Calgary in Canada, which led to the school forking over a $20,000 ransom payment to the hackers, likely started with a phishing email. A malware attack that crippled the NHS, the UK’s national health system, likely also began when a staff member opened a suspicious attachment.

When it comes to social media, carefully consider what you share online, including your location and personal details about your life and family.

 

Use strong passwords.

 Human errors or failings play a big role in online privacy breaches. Most of us choose passwords that we can remember, which means we choose passwords that are easy to crack. Coming up with a strong password needs to be your first priority. It should be a minimum of eight characters and include a capital letter, symbol and a number.

Don’t use the same one for every account. Avoid including obvious aspects of your life such as your spouse’s or pet’s name, or your date of birth. Never, ever use “password” as your password.

 

Use an encrypted mobile phone for secure email.

 Common email providers such as Gmail or Outlook are notoriously insecure.

 With the use of PGP encryption, BlackBerry users can send encrypted email messages that only the intended recipient can decrypt and read. Because messages between PGP BlackBerry devices are encrypted, an intercepted message is meaningless and unreadable. It’s the securest way to communicate privately.

 

Interested in learning more about PGP encryption? Click here

Selling Encryption Isn’t As Hard As You Think

As a business owner or entrepreneur you are constantly looking for new ways to diversify your company in order to grow and expand. Encryption could potentially be the facet to take your business to the next level.

If you have spent any time on the internet chances are you’ve heard of encryption. Without encryption your sensitive data could be compromised. Myntex is a provider for mobile encryption, we are here to ensure that anyone who uses our services can communicate without fear of having their conversations read by anyone but the intended recipient.

There is a flourishing market for this type of encryption as more and more people are fearful of their privacy being taken away. The idea, science, and technicalities of encryption can seem overwhelming to those that haven’t dealt with, or used it before. However when you deal with an encryption provider like Myntex we are more than happy to guide you through the process, and teach you how encryption works.

Offering a mobile encryption solution to your customers is quite an easy process to start. With Myntex there is no upfront fees. We provide you with all the necessary documentation, tutorials, and software needed to get you setup and ready to offer encrypted communication devices to your customers.

Myntex has streamlined the entire sign-up process and offers some of the most competitive wholesale pricing on the market, this provides you with the ability to maximize your profit margins and not have to worry about long drawn out or complicated procedures. We want you to be able to focus on customer relations and sales rather than troubleshooting and long setup processes.

If you would like to learn more about becoming a reseller for Myntex get in touch with us Here

The Importance of Secure and Open Communication

There is no question your personal data and communication is constantly being sought after. Regardless whether you are sending a personal email, doing online banking, or simply browsing your social media, people want access to your data. For that reason encryption was implemented. When you login to your online banking you are using HTTPS protocol to encrypt your data to prevent it from being stolen. However how do you prevent your communications from being intercepted? You encrypt your conversation.

There are many methods to encrypt your communications, however the biggest obstacle to overcome is whether or not your encrypted communications are compatible with the person you are trying to talk to. For this reason cross-company compatibility is key.

There are a few reasons why encryption services might not work together, the most common being blacklisting. This is when two companies use the same type of encryption but one of the two has disallowed the other to communicate with their network. These policies are usually implemented to prevent users from switching services, and locking them into a provider.

Myntex has the firm belief that everyone has the right to privacy, therefore we strive to allow all of our customers to communicate openly, whether they are on our encryption service or not. When we find a network that we are unable to communicate with, we immediately reach out to attempt to open communications. The only people that suffer from networks not being compatible with each other are the end users.

There are companies out there that have purposely disallowed their users to communicate with anyone other than other users within their network. Having a large conglomerate of encrypted service providers allowing cross network communications is key to a healthy ecosystem that everyone including the end user will benefit from.

Here at Myntex we pride ourselves on the code of ethics we practice. No blocking, customers come first, and the reliability of our service being paramount. We spare no time or expense to ensure these morals are followed which we believe will set the bar for other encryption providers. In an unregulated market we hope to set the standard, and will continue to push the importance of secure and open communication.

How Email Encryption Protects Everyone in the UK

In the UK, there’s talk of government moving to ban end-to-end encryption. According to leaked documents, the legislation in question would force technology companies to “build backdoors into their products, in an attempt to allow its intelligence agencies to access civilians’ private data and messages.”

 

This is alarming for many reasons.

Backdoors are easy to exploit. It’s not a case of only granting access to government surveillance teams. Encryption technology doesn’t work that way. Once a backdoor is built into technology, anyone with the know-how — including criminals or corrupt government officials — could gain access to private data. It’s no longer secure.

Frustratingly, a move like this also assumes everyone who uses encryption is a criminal or planning a terrorist attack, despite the fact that all citizens in the UK have a right to communicate securely and privately.

Encrypted communication protects everyone, whether you’re sharing sensitive client documents, planning an event or sending family photos of your baby.

 

Without encryption communications, we’re all at risk

Earlier this year, the UK home secretary pushed for WhatsApp, the widely popular messaging service, to install backdoors in its technology to make it accessible to authorities. Her reasoning was that criminals are discussing their plans using the app and investigators require access.

While no one can prevent criminals from using encrypted communications, a ban on it would risk exposing huge swaths of financial and personal data, simply for the sake of catching a small number of criminals. It’s too big of a threat on civil liberties.

Relying on mainstream telecommunications providers for secure email just isn’t advisable either. Providers regularly store communications and must comply with requests from law enforcement to hand over data.

A sweeping bill — nicknamed The Snooper’s Charter — passed last year in the UK, giving government even more surveillance power and the ability to hack and store data relating to internet use. The Investigatory Powers Act gives the British state the ability to compel service providers and mobile networks to store what you do online for 12 months.

This includes email correspondence and browsing histories.

 

PGP encryption is for anyone who needs it

Myntex users are individuals or businesses in the UK who value their privacy and security. They’re committed to being able to express themselves freely without outside intervention. Businesses have trade secrets they want to protect, as well as sensitive information that cannot be leaked like financial reports and health data.

Using BlackBerry email encryption protects these communications by making intercepted messages impossible to read, and deleting the messages themselves within 24 hours. Because we don’t store messages or encryption keys, there’s nothing for us to turn over to law enforcement even if we are the subject of a subpoena. You’re protected no matter what laws are enacted in the UK.

 

Ready to learn more about encryption?

Everyone Has the Right to Privacy: Knowing Your Digital Rights in the Netherlands

Everyone has a fundamental right to privacy. It’s a reality that in our fast-paced digital world, this right to privacy is constantly under threat. Unlike paper data, digital information can swiftly move across borders and fall easily into the wrong hands. Mobile internet usage in the Netherlands has skyrocketed in the last five years. Statistics show that 80% of Dutch citizens are mobile internet users.

Unfortunately, many people continue to use insecure communication methods that put their privacy at risk, often due to a lack of education about digital privacy laws and surveillance tactics. Knowing your digital rights in the Netherlands will help you make choices that will ultimately guard your privacy.

 

Digital privacy laws in the Netherlands

Laws pertaining to electronic communications and personal data privacy in the Netherlands fall under either the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA) or the Telecommunications Act, and sometimes both.

Under the PDPA, personal data can be legally accessed under certain conditions. Consent must be obtained by the data subject (that’s you) before the act of collecting or processing any identifiable information. Of course, there are exceptions to this right to consent. It’s still possible for your personal information to be shared without your knowledge because of requests from internet service providers or Dutch law enforcement agencies.

According to the Telecommunications Act, it’s your right to be informed by your service or network provider that there’s been a breach of security. Dutch law says that data can be legally stored if it is being used in a criminal investigation or persecution of a serious offence such as terrorism. In this context, the stored data can only be kept for one year.

If you suspect that your personal data is being viewed or processed, it’s your right to request the service provider or party in question to confirm whether or not this is the case. It’s also your right to ask for the logic behind why your data is being processed. You must receive a response in writing within four weeks.

Dutch citizens have the right to submit complaints about digital privacy violations to the Dutch Data Protection Authority via the National Ombudsman.

For more information and support on digital rights in the Netherlands, consider checking out Bits of Freedom, an advocacy organization.

 

How to protect yourself

While Dutch laws seem to have the intention of protecting citizens, it’s obvious that exceptions made for law enforcement investigations and security breaches could still put your personal privacy at risk.

It wasn’t encouraging to see this Dutch official express a willingness to sacrifice privacy for security in order to install encryption “backdoors” in popular messaging apps (luckily, the Dutch government didn’t agree).

Nonetheless, here are some tips for protecting yourself.

Take the time to research telecommunications providers in the Netherlands. The two biggest issues for telecommunications providers are data storage and interference from law enforcement.

A popular provider, KPN, was the victim of a massive hacking incident in 2012. A 17-year-old managed to gain access to the KPN servers and the email addresses of two million users. KPN was forced to revoke access to the email accounts and ask users to reset their passwords.

The company was ultimately fined by the Netherlands Authority for Consumers and Markets for “insufficiently securing customer data.”

The logical next step is to choose a provider that not only encrypts your communications, but doesn’t actually store any of your private information.

Beyond researching your telecommunications provider, consider what may happen to your digital data if you try to cross an international border, as some citizens have run into problems trying to enter the U.S. in recent months. Border guards have asked to search their mobile phones.

While it seems to be within the rights of travellers to refuse the search, it may be easier to delete any unnecessary apps before travelling, take a temporary phone while on vacation or simply use an email encryption service that automatically deletes messages over a day old, and can be wiped at a moment’s notice.

 

Choose PGP encryption for secure communication

Because as citizens we’re at the mercy of laws set by those in power, it’s vital that you choose a communications provider, and a secure device, that makes reading your email impossible.

While BlackBerry PGP encryption can’t necessarily stop emails from being intercepted, the emails themselves are encrypted and can’t be read. You’re in total control of your privacy.

 

Interested in how to protect your communications? Find out more.

Why Myntex Owns Their Canadian Data Centre (and Why That’s Important)

Unlike many encrypted email providers, Myntex houses their servers onsite at our Canadian headquarters. We’d like to explain why having our data centre on the premises is significant, and how this influences how users ultimately choose between encryption providers.

 

We have total control over our servers

Because our data centre is located in our headquarters, we have total control over it. In the event of an issue arising, we can be onsite immediately to troubleshoot the problem. We keep the servers running smoothly, installing critical updates ourselves, controlling the heating, cooling and humidity, and ensuring we have disaster recovery plans in place.

This means fewer interruptions to PGP BlackBerry encryption services for users.

DDOS attacks are a massive problem for communication companies. Competitors, activists and hackers launch DDOS attacks to disrupt users’ service and sometimes even to test exploitable networks. Running your own data centre means you can use multiple methods of DDOS protection with flexible mitigation options.

Our office is located in Canada, so we benefit from laws that protect the digital privacy rights of citizens. Canadian laws aren’t as invasive as those in other countries. If law enforcement wanted to gain access to our servers, they would need a warrant.

Of course, even if Canadian authorities did gain a warrant, they wouldn’t be able to access any emails because they are deleted every 24 hours and without access to the PGP keys, decryption is impossible (more on that later).

 

No security in unstable countries

Unauthorized access to data centres is a real threat in less stable countries. Unfortunately, many encryption providers choose to house their servers in countries different than their headquarters. They may not own their own data centre, as this is a significant investment, so they co-locate in someone else’s data centre. This is incredibly risky for several reasons.

Unstable countries often have unstable governments, who are more likely to bribe a data centre employee for access to their servers. Your data may feel safe until it’s not. As well, there’s no one onsite from the PGP encryption provider to keep tabs on equipment failure, tampering or theft.

 

We don’t actually host data

It’s important to note that all data that comes through Myntex’s servers is encrypted. The encrypted email service is also subject to an automatic delete policy, which means emails are wiped every 24 hours. No one’s data sits needlessly on our servers.

 

Have more questions about our Canadian data centre? We’re happy to chat. Get in touch.